Wednesday – October 22, 2014

 

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SIX CATALYSTS FOR CHANGE AT MATC

  • Classroom_1920s


    1. THE GREAT DEPRESSION

    People who lacked jobs flocked to school for retraining - and still do. Whenever the economy contracts, student numbers increase as people prepare for new opportunities. This was also the time of the rise of technical programs.

    Left: 1920s Classroom.

  • War_production_plant_1940s


    2. WORLD WAR II

    The need for war production worker training brought many to Milwaukee Vocational School (MVS). The school was open 24 hours a day.

    Left: War factory production, 1940s.

  • Registration_1950


    3. POSTWAR YEARS

    As war veterans returned home, they needed training. Apprenticeships brought them to the school while women, who had come out of their homes to work during the war, entered Milwaukee Vocational and Adult School for programs or a class or two to enrich their lives. Immigrants required English as a Second Language and basic skills education.

    Left: Registration, 1950s.

  • Women_s_Softball_Team_1930s


    4. LIBERAL ARTS/COLLEGE TRANSFER PROGRAM EXPANSION/NEW PROGRAMS GALORE

    Students found Milwaukee Institute of Technology (MIT) classes an economical way to begin their four-year degree programs. New programs attracted students. The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools accredited the college. Weekend College and TV College expanded opportunities.

    Left: Electronics class, 1962.

  • 1975_North_Campus


    5. DISTRICT EXPANSION

    The Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) system began with expansion of Milwaukee Technical College (MTC) throughout Milwaukee County, southern Ozaukee County, and part of Washington County. The college became known as Milwaukee Area Technical College. Mequon and Oak Creek campuses were built, and West Allis Campus began an expansion of the West Allis Vocational School buildings. Evening centers burgeoned.

    Left: Mequon Campus construction, 1975.

  • 2009_ECAM


    6. THE TECHNOLOGY EXPLOSION

    Computer development, robotics, digital technologies, medical technologies, and other breakthroughs brought the employed and underemployed back to school to keep their skills current and expand their advancement possibilities. Online and other alternative delivery systems became popular.

    Left: ECAM opened at the Oak Creek Campus, 2008.